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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
at the wreckage of a u.s. f-15 that crashed today in rebel-held eastern libya, for reasons the u.s. military says were mechanical, not hostile. i will say that again for you. the u.s. says the plane had equipment problems and was not shot down. the two-man crew jekted and the pilot was recovered quickly. the weapons officer was found by rebels and americans reached him. neither badly hurt. >>> back in tripoli, reporters saw the results of a missile landing on a port. >>> we also have remarkable pictures from misrata, a city down the coast that gadhafi forces have bombarded for days. this is amateur video uploaded to youtube yesterday. now, we can't confirm when or where it was shot, but we do know misrata's main hospital reports 77 deaths since sunday. the u.n.-approved campaign to protect libyan civilians began saturday and it's still not clear who will actually end up in charge. arab states don't want to work for nato and u.s. has other campaigns to worry about. nato says it will enforce a libyan arms embarge go the in meantime. let's bring in diana magnay, she's on the "uss keer sauj." nic rep
weapons of the nato alliance, like this air strike by britain. and yet, u.s. military officials concede today that the libyan regime is still determined to fight and reinforced its positions in the eastern cities fwh including ajdabiya. the occasion says gadhafi is trying to recruit and arm volunteers to fight rebel forces. the libyan strongman defiant as nato moves to take over command of the libyan mission. the top u.s. commander of the operation tells me that nato has now agreed in principle to not only take charge of the no-fully zone but to also to protect libyan civilians as well. the details will be worked out, he says, over the next few erda. general carter ham sending a message directly to gadhafi. here in "the situation room," we spoke just a littlewhilego and i had this exchange with him. cnn is seen live around the world, including in libya. and officer your military-to-military -- the officers surrounding gadhafi might be watching right now, gadhafi might be watching, his sons might be watching. look into atthe camera. what would you say to them right now, officer t officer
plants right here in the united states. >>> and will the u.s. supreme court green light a massive discrimination lawsuit against walmart? arguments today in one of the most important workers' rights cases the court has ever heard. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> moammar gadhafi and his troops are being accused of new carnage and destruction. just hours after president obama tried to explain the u.s. mission in libya to the american people. this hour we have breaking news. we're learning about major, major setbacks for rebel forces in several cities. in misrata, witnesses say government forces are hammering the city hard, firing bullets over civilians' heads and telling them to run for their lives. gadhafi is fighting back with a vengeance against rebels who had regained ground in recent days under the cover of coalition air strikes. >>> and joining us now in ajdabiya is our own arwa damon. you're with the rebels there. how are they doing, arwa? what's the latest? >> reporter: well, wolf, it's been another bitterly disappointing day for the opposition here. th
moammar gadhafi in power. hillary clinton represents the u.s. ban ki moon and more will attend. they called on gadhafi to leave libya. >>> the u.s. president made his case to fellow americans for intervening in libya's civil war. barack obama said the u.s. had a responsibility to act to the overt a civilian massacre but not to seek by force. libyan fighters very run into resistance. >>> disturbing news we're hearing about radiation levels at the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. radioactive water may be leaking from a containment vessel. they've also found plutonium in the soil, but the levels, they say, are not harmful to humans. >>> pro-government demonstrations are expected in syria on tuesday. one of the latest places to have anti-government protests being held. "world business" starts now. >>> good morning, from cnn london, i'm nina del santos. >> and i'm pauline chu, and this is world business today. the top stories on this tuesday, march 29th. u.s. president barack obama tries to explain his country's intervention in libya, but his critics are counting the cost of t
obama from the east room of the white house essentially saying the u.s. will help lead the international enforcement of a no-fly zone over libya. he also took some time there outlining what american forces will not be doing. >> the united states is not going to deploy ground troops into libya and we are not going the use force to go beyond a well-defined goal. >> in moments i'll be speaking live with nic robertson in libya and wolf blitzer about who makes the next move here. that's in just a moment. we're also learning here as we're staying on top of the story in japan, we're learning trace amounts of radiation have reached the united states' west coast, all the way from this fukushima daiichi power plant in japan. so i'll be speaking with the mayor of los angeles shortly. and we'll find out what the new danger rating is right around fukushima, where that power plant is still out of control here. it's been one week to the day after the earthquake and tsunami hit. looked at this video here, video that was flagged for us, showing some of the new views we're getting from the powerful tsunam
united does admit that united will be shrinking it's domestic u.s. network because, he says, the focus in the future is going to be on international coverage. >> the domestic u.s. is a very difficult place to make money. brutal regulation and overtaxation, so it's very hard to make money domestically and that's why our growth has been international. even this year as we were originally going to grow between 1% and 2% this year and because of high fuel prices, we have brought that back to flat. but even there, that flat is comprised of shrink the domestic systems and growing the international systems. >> this is fascinating because this tells us that the united-continental merger says that airlines in the united states is going to start to look very different. it's got these massive hubs, chicago, washington, houston, newark, los angeles, san francisco, denver. but they're going to be geared to funneling out to the rest of the world. >> so did he say anything about the frequent flyer miles? that's what i want to know. >> tell me about it. he did admit that between them, united and conti
ruled yemen for 32 years. he is a key u.s. ally in the fight against al qaeda. meanwhile, president obama plans to speak to the nation monday night about libya to explain why he ordered u.s. military action and give an update on the operation. today french and british jets struck libyan artillery and tanks near ajdabiya. smoke could be seen miles away. late today, rebels began a new push to retake the city. and libyan state television showed damage from overnight air strikes in tripoli. nato, which is taking over control of enforcing the no-fly zone, said it's planning for a mission that would last three months. as other nations play a larger role, the u.s. is publicly taking a step back, but it's a small step. more on that from david martin at the pentagon. >> reporter: this is what the battle for libya looks like to a pilot. it's a british pilot attacking a libyan tank. but more than half the 96 strike missions in the past 24 hours were american. and so were all 16 of the tomahawk cruise missiles fired overnight. despite the announcement that nato would soon be taking command of t
american fighters jets are active at the moment, u.s. pilots flew 113 of the 175 coalition air sorties yesterday, for example, that u.s. role will shrink dramatically in the next few days leaving others to decide on military targeting. on the ground all public signals from the regime suggest continued defiance and continued attacks on the opposition. but here's the intriguing nugget. senior u.s. officials tell cnn tonight that some members of gadhafi's inner circle are reaching out to the state department and reaching out to other arab nations, as well. curious contacts to say the least but as yet our sources tell us no indication gadhafi himself is looking to negotiate an exit strategy. >> i think there are any number of possible outcomes here, and no one is in a position to predict them. whether they're -- whether there are major further defections or divisions within his family, there are a variety of possibilities that seems to me. >> a variety of possibilities but listen here, secretary gates isn't betting on a peaceful settlement. >> gadhafi has basically sworn that he will show
a nationwide review to see if u.s. plants are vulnerable to the same type of earthquake that hit japan. the indian point station is about 25 miles from new york city has two operating nuclear reactors and it sits right on top of the ramapo fault line. the nrc filed a report uncovering a higher safety risk at the plant than previously thought. and that's gotten the attention of new york governor andrew cuomo, a long-time opponent of indian point. >> the world has changed. reevalua reevaluate. reevaluate and look at the situation and decide whether or not you should grant this facility a license today. with what you know today. >> now, we had a chance to speak with officials from energy corp. on our show last week. they say they welcome a safety review. 27 nuclear reactors, including indian point have been singled out for inspections by the nrc. allan chernoff has been granted exclusive access inside the indian point plant and we'll have his report coming up in the next hour of "american morning." >>> another morning of explosions in tripoli and heavy aircraft fire. as of last night, the
at the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. while this committee does not have oversight on the safety of u.s. nuclear plants, we do have to consider how events such as those at fukushima affected the ability of our nation's nuclear freedom, 104 reactors, to supply electricity. of course, these 104 reactors currently account for about 20% of the electricity that we use and what the future of nuclear energy will be as part of our nation's energy banks. events at fukushima are changing by the our. they are serious, and we are watching those events unfold on the other side of the world. our knowledge at best is incomplete. as we look forward to these experts and forming a committee on what they see at the plant, how would impact our nation must existing fleet of reactors, and answer questions the committee members might have. before i introduce our two -- our first panel, we have four witnesses, two on this first panel and two on the second trip before i introduced the panel, let me call on senator murkowski for comment. >> let me welcome those who are presenting today. i appreciate the time is
then become the largest class action employment suit in u.s. history. walmart, america's largest private employer, says, no, the class would be too big, the plaintiffs too dissimilar, the issues too many to litigate. the plaintiffs say walmart wants a big company exception to civil rights 0 law. two lower federal courts have ruled the class and case can go forward. that brings us to the supreme court where we now have three women justices, the most ever. cnn's kate bolduan has been following the case for us and joins us to recap the arguments. kate, good to see you. any sign that the women justices were at all receptive to the plaintiffs? >> reporter: that's very interesting. i would say, first off, that it did seem in the courtroom with the aggressive question you did hear from the female justices, that they were receptive to the women's claims to the sides of the plaintiffs. but, as i just said, there are three women on this court. so what it's looking like -- we always have to give it a huge caveat here because of course we never know until the justices rule -- from the commentary and
out to the united states. senior u.s. officials tell cnn that a brother-in-law has been calling the state department almost every day. arab allies say they're also getting calls. we heard this talk yesterday from secretary of state clinton. it could be a sign that gadhafi's regime is looking for a way out. it could also be disinformation being put forward by the u.s. and others to make gadhafi not trust the people around him. in an interview, president obama said that gadhafi could wait it out, even though his forces have been weakened. today, secretary of state clinton said gadhafi and his inner circle have some choices to make. >> it will be up to gadhafi and his insiders to determine what their next steps are. but we would certainly encourage that they would make the right decision. not only institute a real comprehensive cease-fire, but withdraw from the cities and the military actions and prepare for a transition that does not include colonel gadhafi. the quickest way for him to end this is to actually serve the libyan people by leaving. >> gadhafi shows no sign that he's r
or airplanes. he stressed the u.s. is diplomatically supporting the no-fly zone, not the enforcement itself. no american troops on the ground, no american planes, no enforcement itself, that's what we know. what we don't know is a lot bigger. joining us now, eugene robinson, pulitzer prize winning columnist for "the washington post." thanks for being here. >> good evening, chris. >> what do you make of president obama's remarks on libya today? are we now at war? was that the communication? even coming away from it, i had a hard time answering that question for myself. >> when i heard the president's speech, i thought gee, we might be, and here is why. he said very clearly that as far as he's concerned and the united states is concerned, gadhafi has lost the legitimacy to lead. he forfeited the right to be president of libya, and he set these demands, gadhafi has to stop, he has to withdraw, these are not negotiable and there will be consequences. so that to me says we are going to use force to make gadhafi do what we want him to do. >> and of course, if he doesn't do what we want him to do,
. a be in of aircraft being brought to bear here. also the warships with the cruise missiles out in the sea, five u.s. ships, three submarines, british submarines and ships as well. different aircraft from the french, the united states, the uk as well. we're approaching 140 missiles used in the first three days in libya. the uk flying from here and here, the french, the dutch, the canadians, the united states, all using an array of bases in europe, including nato bases in italy. all of these nations working together, the focus right here. >> and since then, of course, the coalition has fired more cruise missiles into libya. pauline? >> on the ground, nina, libyan rebels are now able to hold on to areas government forces were poised to capture just days ago. arwa damon tells us about the elation and the profound concern opposition members in benghazi are still feeling. >> reporter: the protesters vowing, chanting that with their blood and souls they will continue to fight for their nation. also, we're calling the names of zinton and misrata. two cities where there are ongoing massacres by gadhafi sour
is falling against the u.s. dollar, currently trading at 1.407 6. but on the other hand, the dollar is gaining against the british pound and the japanese yen. when it comes to the yen, that's trading at 83.02. and the pound trading at 1.6025. pauline? >>> the weaker yen gave exporters a big boost in the tokyo trading this session. the nikkei reversed several days of losses to become the region's top performer on this wednesday. but tokyo electric power's shares continue to take a beating. they close down 18% for a third straight day. now they're down more than 71% for the year. around the rest of the region, mining and metals companies lift australia's benchmark. bhp billiton and rio tinto gained 2% by the close. and property stocks were the winners after reports. hutchinson alcoa was the best performer up nearly 4%. >>> the nuclear crisis is taking a toll on the company's president. he's hospitalized suffering from fatigue and stress. meantime, the chief executive of tokyo electric power has apologized for the wide range of damage caused by the fukushima daiichi power plant. the na
>>> a lot happening around the world right here at home, as well. let's get you caught up. the u.s. and its allies pounding libya for a third day. 120 cruise missiles and counting. is this going to help keep moammar gadhafi from attacking his own people? >>> smoke rising from a reactor. workers evacuated. and now there are new concerns about radiation in the food supply. >>> and here at home, a major cell phone merger. the number two carrier poised to become number one. what this means to you. let's get started. "american morning" begins right now. >>> good morning, everybody. >> it's monday, march 21st. >> it's great to see all of you this morning. we're following two stories again, but major developments from where we left off on friday. >> breaking news from japan. >> smoke spotted coming from a damaged nuclear reactor. engineers are struggling there to prevent a meltdown after a devastating earthquake and tsunami earlier this month. let's get to anna coren. i understand it's now been evacuated. what's going on there? >> reporter: that's exactly right, ali. they thought they wer
simply to stay indoors. the u.s. and other countries have set a much wider evacuation zone for their people, 80 kilometers or 50 miles from daiichi. >>> now, we've all gotten a crash course in nuclear physics over the past two weeks or so, but to understand the impact of are possible containment breachi want to bring in at. scientist. bill nye, the science guy, joins us live from l.a., and bill knows all about this. bill, good to see you. would a leaking reactor core which we m be seeing here, would it be a major escalation of this disaster or just simply another complication? >> it's probably a major escalation. now, if it's not the core that's cracked, it's some plumbing, some pipes, that lead into it. because when you get this knd of radioactivity level going up so fast, it's probably plutonium. now, this sounds like science fiction, and it kind of is. u transmute uranium into plutonium by giving it a jolt. you change someneutrons into protons and it becomes fantastically radioactive. and glen cyborg himself who won abel prize for creating plutonium, told me it's toxic a
and there are clear signs of headway on two fronts. no more need for cruise missiles since in the words of one u.s. official we now have air dominance. coalition forces can fly to their targets in jets having little to fear from the bombed out defenses of the regime. if you're counting, the allies fired 162 tomahawk missiles since saturday. the vast majority american. if carried out 175 sorties since yesterday. behind the scenes we may be nearing a breakthrough in the back and forth over command and control. the u.s. and britain won a leading role for nato. france and arab nations don't. now it seems nato will coordinate the troops and hardware while political leaders call the shots. they're due to meet tuesday in london. >>> moammar gadhafi is vaui is o fight on. i want to bring in cnn national security analyst peter bergen to talk about this. good to have you with us. let's start by talking about the opposition. we heard so much about the rebels on the ground in libya. what do you know about them and do you know if they can be trusted? >> well, let's start with the fact that the u.s. government
. is there a contradiction in what this mission is? because we've heard from u.s. officials gadhafi has lost legitimacy, they want him out, but the security council resolution talks about protecting civilians. what's the mission? >> if you talk to u.s. officials, they say the mission immediately is to stop the violence against the civilians. but then they also talk about a series of kind of stages that, in in other words, sequencing is the word they're using, one step at a time. they say okay, we're going to try to freeze his advance, especially to benghazi, and continue to tighten the noose in other ways. so they're freely admitting it make take some time to get him to step down, if he each does. i just got some new information from a senior u.s. official. we're here at the airport about to take off with hillary clinton to paris to that meeting on libya. he said that the libyans were still reaching out to the united states. in fact, the foreign minister musa kusa has been calling officials in the united states and they continue to say we're going to have a cease-fire, we're going to have a cease-fire.
on that later in the hour. now libya, though. the top commander of the u.s. military operation in libya says nato has agreed in principle to not only take over the no-fly zone, but also the broader mission of protecting civilians. he said it's all going to happen very soon. here's what general carter hamm said today on "the situation room." >> we expect that nato will take over the no-fly zone this weekend, and then the next piece, the third and final piece, is the mission to protect civilians. nato, it's my understanding that nato has agreed to that in principle and will this command decide on the procedures and timing of accepting that mission. but i think that will probably occur in the very near future. >> ham also said that removing moammar gadhafi from power by military means is not the aim of the mission and the coalition isn't arming the opposition. but the coalition strikes on gadhafi's mechanism of power continue. authorities say coalition fighter planes took out seven libyan tanks in 24 hours. in fact, we got this video from the british ministry of defense showing british aircraft
the nation. saying u.s. role in attacking moammar gadhafi forces is limited, but necessary. >> i refuse to wait for the images of slaughter in mass graves before taking action. >> gadhafi is still clinging to power and many question whether the u.s. and its allies are doing enough to push him out. we will talk with tu.s. baee ambassador to the u.n. and john mccain. >>> the snake hunt. the venomous cobra that escaped from the bronx zoo remains on loose this morning creating a media frenzy and inspiring a legion of twitter followers "early" this tuesday morning, march 29th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good tuesday morning. i'm erica hill. >> i'm chris wragge. welcome back to the country. the time zone, the program. >> nice to be back sitting next to you, chris. >>> things were busy while i was away. >>> more on the president speech's last night and that ongoing battle for libya. this morning, rebel forces are macing more resistance from gadhafi militias. a state department diplomat is going to benghazi and meet with rebel leaders for the first time. in the meantime, secretary of st
all of this is. on the heels of a nuclear prices in japan, south carolina here in the u.s. went to court demanding that the nuclear regulatory commission provide a permanent place to store america's waste. there are 104 operating reactors, they're scattered across 65 plants in 31 different states. if you take a look at this map, this gives you a better idea of exactly where this 63 thousand tons of spent fuel, the darker the color of the state, the more radioactive waste that state has, according to the nrc. again, we're talking about 63,000 tons of spent fuel. if you take a look, with the telestrator working, illinois is the state with most, 776 tons. coming in second place is pennsylvania. as we know, pennsylvania, the site of three mile island, the nuclear site that had zadisaste back in the late '80s. and 3,700 tons of spent fuel. pretty much a tie with north carolina and south carolina here. let me show you a map quickly that illustrates what we're talking about when we say spent fuel. these are the spent fuel pools. they're steel-lined concrete pools filled with water like
to school. kept the lights on during a calm day at the wind farm. heated 57 million u.s. homes. simmered grandma's chicken noodle soup. melted tons of recycled glass. roasted millions of coffee beans. provided electricity for nearly 29 million home computers. heated your bathwater. cooked your takeout. lit your way home. we helped america import less of its energy. cleared the air by burning cleaner than other fuel sources, with less pollutants and no mercury. and tomorrow, we could do even more. we're cleaner, domestic, abundant and ready now. we're america's natural gas. the smarter power today. learn more at anga.us. basic. preferred. at meineke i have options on oil changes. and now i get free roadside assistance with preferred or supreme. my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> a live picture of flight tracker.com, you can see there behind me, those are all the planes that are in the air right now. imagine, though, what would happen if they had to land without the help of air traffic control? that actually did happen to two planes at washington's reagan national airport shortly after m
. bbc news, tripoli. >> the general in charge of u.s. africa demand, leading coalition operations in libya, and said he does not expect operations to continue much longer. >> i do not think it will go on for very long time. and we have an opportunity to execute the requirements of the u.n. security council resolution. the most important part of which is to protect civilians. it is important to note with the net to a large degree by stopping the regime's attacks on benghazi. there are other places where civilians remain threatened by the regime. we are doing our best each and every day and night to protect the civilians. >> you are watching "bbc world news." still to come on the program -- more worries in japan around the fukushima nuclear plant. one of the reactors could be damaged. the countries involved and the military coalition over libya have been financing a deal to transfer political control of their campaign -- finessing a deal to transfer political control of their campaign to nato. matthew price reports. >> slowly, but surely, it is being transferred to nato. command rem
stalemate, which is very bad for the libyan people who continue to suffer, it's very bad for the u.s. and the rest of the coalition maintaining this no-fly zone. i can't see anything good about a projected stalemate. it's true, we don't know what the opposition would be like when they take over, but there are actually some promising signs. but the important thing is we should be in there, we should be working with them. i don't know why what we do with them should be covert at all. frankly, there's a lot we ought to do that's not lethal, starting with just the fact of recognizing this is a war of momentum. right after the strikes began, the momentum shifted back to the opposition. it looks dangerously as though it's tilting the other way now. the u.s. would have joined qatar and france and other countries would have come along and recognizing this provisional government, i think it would send a powerful message to gadhafi that the end is coming. >> bob, from what we understand, there are cia officers on the ground trying to understand, i guess, make contacts with the opposition, figu
argument against arming the opposition forces is the u.s. isn't really sure who they're arming, there may be anti-american elements among them, that president obama acknowledged. i just want to show our viewers of what some of president obama and secretary of state clinton said earlier today. >> first of all, i think it's important to note that the people that we've met with have been fully vetted. so we have a clear sense of who they are. so far they're saying the right things and most of them are professionals, lawyers, doctors, people who appear to be credible. >> we do not have any specific information about specific individuals from any organization who are part of this. but of course, we're still getting to know those who are leading the trends -- the transitional national council and that will be a process that continues. >> seems to be slightly contradictory statements from the president and the secretary of state. that is part of the problem in terms of who do you arm and where do those arms potentially end up. >> it certainly is part of the problem. you know, you never really kn
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)